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English 101  Composition as Critical Inquiry

This version was saved 8 years, 9 months ago View current version     Page history
Saved by Ana Roncero Bellido
on January 10, 2013 at 5:10:04 pm
 

Course Policies Schedule Projects Readings, Samples and Resources

                                                         Welcome to English 101  

 

Ana Roncero Bellido

aironce@ilstu.edu
STV 424 C
Office hours: Mondays: 4.15 - 5.15
                      Wednesdays: 12 - 2

                           and by appointment.

   

Section 30: MWF    STV 250 J

Section 39: MWF    STV  250 E 

 

 

Required Materials

GWRJ Spring 2013
Access to the Internet

A Printer or access to a printer (Money on RedBird card).
A flash drive for backing up files (recommended).

If you buy magazines during this semester, please keep them for future use.


Course Description
          
Welcome to ISU and your English 101.10 class! 

 

Contrary to what you may think based on the name of this class, the goal of English 101.10 Composition as Critical Inquiry is not to teach you how to “write well.” Sure, we will be writing in this class. However, this semester we will work on projects which are probably totally different to those you have been doing in any other writing class. “How come?,” you may ask. Well, writing is not only about those academic papers teachers grade in bulk; our daily life woks out through writing: Facebook and Twitters updates, emails, texts, shopping lists … you are a writer already!

 

This course will, nevertheless, help you to become a stronger writer. Using a genre studies approach (don’t worry, you’ll get to know what that is), this class will require your active participation as we research and experiment with different genres. But remember, we will examine these genres, not become experts on them.

 

Furthermore, we will try to help each other with group activities and peer review tasks that will allow us to both look at other writings and get different insights to our work rather than just the one coming from the instructor…  Because we do a great work when writing, so why not letting others enjoy it? :)

 

 

Learning Outcomes

1. Identifying Genres:

         Students should be able to identify the features of multiple genres, and articulate (through verbal or written communication) the differences that separate these genres (this ability to include both academic and nonacademic genres).

         Students should be able to document (through verbal or written communication) how the features of a particular genre work to shape the genre’s content, style, and structure through visual, conceptual, stylistic constraints, as well as through the expectations of the reader/user.

         Students should be able to demonstrate (through verbal or written communication) how choices in their own writing either conform (or don’t) to the established features of the genre in which they are working.

         Students should be able to compare how the features of different genres shape content (and knowledge making) in different ways.
 

2. Creating Content:

         Students should be able to create content in multiple genres.

         Students should be able to employ cognitive/conceptual skills related to argument and analysis in their textual productions, and be able to identify the use of these strategies in their own productions.

         Students should be able to employ a range of other skills (rhetorical strategies, mechanics, style, etc.) and defend these choices as thoughtful response to specific writing and genre situations.

3. Organizing Information in Multiple Genres:

         Students should be able to identify the organizational structures that govern different kinds of writing genres.

 

4. Technology/Media:

         Students should be able to identify the technologies (print or digital) and tools necessary to produce a text in a given genre.

         Students should be able to decide on and use appropriate digital and print technologies to produce a genre (based on the genre’s required features).

         Students should be able to demonstrate (through written or verbal communication) how a given text is affected by the use of different technologies or media (in terms of its conception, production, and distribution, as well as the potential ways the text may be taken up by users).

5. The Trajectories of Literate Activity:

          Students should be able to trace the trajectories of a text (the path a text takes in its production, distribution, and use) in reference to the context and history that shape a genre or a writing situation in a particular ways. This includes the way a particular instance of text is shaped by interactions with people, materials, and technologies; the social and cultural forces that shape how a genre is understood and identified; and the potential uses (both intended and unintended) that reader/users may devise for the text and its content.

6. Flexible Research Skills:

         Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of how to find a variety of source materials for research purposes. This should include using digital databases, print material, and archival resources.

         Students should demonstrate an awareness of the various methods that can be used to collect data (e.g., experiment, observation, various kinds of survey, and interview methods).

 

7. Using Citation Formats and Citing Source Material in Multiple Genres:

         Students should be able to cite sources correctly according to one or more academic citation formats (MLA, APA, CBE, Chicago Manual of Style).

         Students should be able to integrate source material into their written projects in ways appropriate to the projects’ genre(s).2 This includes the ability to cite material correctly, to quote and paraphrase source material, and to effectively integrate source material to support an argument, persuasive goal, or analysis.

         Students should be able to investigate and demonstrate how different methods of citing source material (including academic and non-academic attribution) are shaped by the goals and intentions embedded in the citation style.

8. Grammatical Usage and Sentence Structure:

          Students should be able to identify how specific genres are defined, in part through the use of  sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary.

         Students should demonstrate the ability to make informed decisions regarding the appropriate sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary in their own writing (based on an assessment of the various genre features required in a particular writing situation).

         Students should be able to identify the match between an example of a genre that they’ve produced and a representative example of that same genre (in terms of grammar, usage, and style).

         Students should be able to identify in their own writing projects the aspects of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary which require improvement, and demonstrate through multiple revisions the ability to address these problem areas.

9. Cultural & Social Contexts:

         Students should be able to identify cultural, political and social interactions that shape or influence how writing happens in a particular genre or situation. These might be local interactions within a particular group that specifically constrain how a particular text is produced, or interactions that take place at a national or international level and impact texts and genres more generally.

 

 

Learning Outcomes
1. Identifying Genres:

         Students should be able to identify the features of multiple genres, and articulate (through verbal or written communication) the differences that separate these genres (this ability to include both academic and nonacademic genres).

         Students should be able to document (through verbal or written communication) how the features of a particular genre work to shape the genre’s content, style, and structure through visual, conceptual, stylistic constraints, as well as through the expectations of the reader/user.

         Students should be able to demonstrate (through verbal or written communication) how choices in their own writing either conform (or don’t) to the established features of the genre in which they are working.

         Students should be able to compare how the features of different genres shape content (and knowledge making) in different ways.

2. Creating Content:

         Students should be able to create content in multiple genres.

         Students should be able to employ cognitive/conceptual skills related to argument and analysis in their textual productions, and be able to identify the use of these strategies in their own productions.

         Students should be able to employ a range of other skills (rhetorical strategies, mechanics, style, etc.) and defend these choices as thoughtful response to specific writing and genre situations.

3. Organizing Information in Multiple Genres:

         Students should be able to identify the organizational structures that govern different kinds of writing genres.

 

4. Technology/Media:

         Students should be able to identify the technologies (print or digital) and tools necessary to produce a text in a given genre.

         Students should be able to decide on and use appropriate digital and print technologies to produce a genre (based on the genre’s required features).

         Students should be able to demonstrate (through written or verbal communication) how a given text is affected by the use of different technologies or media (in terms of its conception, production, and distribution, as well as the potential ways the text may be taken up by users).

5. The Trajectories of Literate Activity:

          Students should be able to trace the trajectories of a text (the path a text takes in its production, distribution, and use) in reference to the context and history that shape a genre or a writing situation in a particular ways. This includes the way a particular instance of text is shaped by interactions with people, materials, and technologies; the social and cultural forces that shape how a genre is understood and identified; and the potential uses (both intended and unintended) that reader/users may devise for the text and its content.

6. Flexible Research Skills:

         Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of how to find a variety of source materials for research purposes. This should include using digital databases, print material, and archival resources.

         Students should demonstrate an awareness of the various methods that can be used to collect data (e.g., experiment, observation, various kinds of survey, and interview methods).

 

7. Using Citation Formats and Citing Source Material in Multiple Genres:

         Students should be able to cite sources correctly according to one or more academic citation formats (MLA, APA, CBE, Chicago Manual of Style).

         Students should be able to integrate source material into their written projects in ways appropriate to the projects’ genre(s).2 This includes the ability to cite material correctly, to quote and paraphrase source material, and to effectively integrate source material to support an argument, persuasive goal, or analysis.

         Students should be able to investigate and demonstrate how different methods of citing source material (including academic and non-academic attribution) are shaped by the goals and intentions embedded in the citation style.

8. Grammatical Usage and Sentence Structure:

          Students should be able to identify how specific genres are defined, in part through the use of  sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary.

         Students should demonstrate the ability to make informed decisions regarding the appropriate sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary in their own writing (based on an assessment of the various genre features required in a particular writing situation).

         Students should be able to identify the match between an example of a genre that they’ve produced and a representative example of that same genre (in terms of grammar, usage, and style).

         Students should be able to identify in their own writing projects the aspects of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary which require improvement, and demonstrate through multiple revisions the ability to address these problem areas.

9. Cultural & Social Contexts:

         Students should be able to identify cultural, political and social interactions that shape or influence how writing happens in a particular genre or situation. These might be local interactions within a particular group that specifically constrain how a particular text is produced, or interactions that take place at a national or international level and impact texts and genres more generally.

Required Materials

GWRJ Spring 2012
Access to the Internet

A Printer or access to a printer (Money on RedBird card).
A flash drive for backing up files (recommended).

If you buy magazines during this semester, please keep them for future use.


Course Description
          
Welcome to ISU and your English 101.10 class! 

Contrary to what you may think based on the name of this class, the goal of English 101.10 Composition as Critical Inquiry is not to teach you how to “write well.” Sure, we will be working with writing in this class. However, this semester we will work on projects which are probably totally different to those you have been doing in any other writing class. “How come?,” you may ask. Well, writing is not only about writing those academic papers teachers grade in bulk! Our daily life woks out through writing: Facebook and Twitters updates, emails, texts, shopping lists … you are a writer already!

 

This course will, nevertheless, help you to become a stronger writer. Using a genre studies approach (don’t worry, you’ll get to know what that is), this class will require your active participation as we research and experiment with different genres. But remember, we will examine these genres, not become experts on them.

 

Furthermore, we will try to help each other with group activities and peer review tasks that will allow us to both look at other writings and get different insights to our work rather than just the one coming from the instructor…  Because we do a great work when writing, why not letting others enjoy it?

Learning Outcomes
1. Identifying Genres:

         Students should be able to identify the features of multiple genres, and articulate (through verbal or written communication) the differences that separate these genres (this ability to include both academic and nonacademic genres).

         Students should be able to document (through verbal or written communication) how the features of a particular genre work to shape the genre’s content, style, and structure through visual, conceptual, stylistic constraints, as well as through the expectations of the reader/user.

         Students should be able to demonstrate (through verbal or written communication) how choices in their own writing either conform (or don’t) to the established features of the genre in which they are working.

         Students should be able to compare how the features of different genres shape content (and knowledge making) in different ways.

2. Creating Content:

         Students should be able to create content in multiple genres.

         Students should be able to employ cognitive/conceptual skills related to argument and analysis in their textual productions, and be able to identify the use of these strategies in their own productions.

         Students should be able to employ a range of other skills (rhetorical strategies, mechanics, style, etc.) and defend these choices as thoughtful response to specific writing and genre situations.

3. Organizing Information in Multiple Genres:

         Students should be able to identify the organizational structures that govern different kinds of writing genres.

 

4. Technology/Media:

         Students should be able to identify the technologies (print or digital) and tools necessary to produce a text in a given genre.

         Students should be able to decide on and use appropriate digital and print technologies to produce a genre (based on the genre’s required features).

         Students should be able to demonstrate (through written or verbal communication) how a given text is affected by the use of different technologies or media (in terms of its conception, production, and distribution, as well as the potential ways the text may be taken up by users).

5. The Trajectories of Literate Activity:

          Students should be able to trace the trajectories of a text (the path a text takes in its production, distribution, and use) in reference to the context and history that shape a genre or a writing situation in a particular ways. This includes the way a particular instance of text is shaped by interactions with people, materials, and technologies; the social and cultural forces that shape how a genre is understood and identified; and the potential uses (both intended and unintended) that reader/users may devise for the text and its content.

6. Flexible Research Skills:

         Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of how to find a variety of source materials for research purposes. This should include using digital databases, print material, and archival resources.

         Students should demonstrate an awareness of the various methods that can be used to collect data (e.g., experiment, observation, various kinds of survey, and interview methods).

 

7. Using Citation Formats and Citing Source Material in Multiple Genres:

         Students should be able to cite sources correctly according to one or more academic citation formats (MLA, APA, CBE, Chicago Manual of Style).

         Students should be able to integrate source material into their written projects in ways appropriate to the projects’ genre(s).2 This includes the ability to cite material correctly, to quote and paraphrase source material, and to effectively integrate source material to support an argument, persuasive goal, or analysis.

         Students should be able to investigate and demonstrate how different methods of citing source material (including academic and non-academic attribution) are shaped by the goals and intentions embedded in the citation style.

8. Grammatical Usage and Sentence Structure:

          Students should be able to identify how specific genres are defined, in part through the use of  sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary.

         Students should demonstrate the ability to make informed decisions regarding the appropriate sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary in their own writing (based on an assessment of the various genre features required in a particular writing situation).

         Students should be able to identify the match between an example of a genre that they’ve produced and a representative example of that same genre (in terms of grammar, usage, and style).

         Students should be able to identify in their own writing projects the aspects of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, and vocabulary which require improvement, and demonstrate through multiple revisions the ability to address these problem areas.

9. Cultural & Social Contexts:

         Students should be able to identify cultural, political and social interactions that shape or influence how writing happens in a particular genre or situation. These might be local interactions within a particular group that specifically constrain how a particular text is produced, or interactions that take place at a national or international level and impact texts and genres more generally.

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